Day 21: Duncan - Eugenia, 530.5 km completed

We left Trail angels Justin and Eva’s place this morning for our first sight of Beaver Valley. The escarpment in this section runs down the length of the valley on the east side, then goes right back up again on the west side. It’s a long way too - the trail runs for 20 km on each side, and you spend the whole time looking across at the distance you’ll travel the next day.

We kept a cautious eye on the weather -  reports of high winds and thunderstorms for the afternoon kept us walking as quickly as our legs would take us. We made it through the day without getting wet, but the winds were howling across Beaver Valley, and all the trees were bending and creaking ominously above us. 

The trail took us through a neat slot canyon in the morning, and a pretty big re-route that went all the way down to the bottom of Beaver Valley. We stopped in at Kimberly for a quick snack before heading right back up the steep slopes on the south side of Old Baldy, the big cliffs that overlook the town below. We finished the day crossing over the beautiful Eugenia Falls. 

Before I finish up, I want to give a quick shout out to Trail Angel Danny who’s been posting these blogs while we’re on the trail. We found out at the last minute that we couldn’t update the website ourselves on the trail, so we send Danny our reports and he posts them every single night, even when he’s down in Maryland. Thanks Danny!

Friday Facts: Eugenia’s Gold Rush for Fools

The place we’re in tonight, Eugenia, got its claim to fame from a gold rush on the town in 1853. Old farmer Brownlee stumbled on Eugenia Falls and found gold nuggets at the base. He must have been hootin’ and hollerin’ something fierce about his discovery, because over 200 prospectors soon descended on the town in search of their own piece of the pie. After only 3 weeks though, the good news turned sour when it was discovered that Brownlee’s gold was nothing but iron pyrite - fool’s gold. The town still has a gold rush festival every year to remember that day 168 years ago.

Happy Trails,

Chris