Day 14: Hockley Valley - Mono Cliffs, 344.5 km completed

Today was a BIG day. Not only was it the longest day we have ever walked (even in training), it was also the most elevation gain. We completed 35.5 km and over 1,000 metres of elevation.

Imagine walking 1 km straight up a ladder... with packs. Our hamstrings are feeling it.

We started out scaling switch backs towards Hockley Valley Ski Resort. T hen we climbed the ski hill. We alternated between hair pin turns and grassy fields.

Yesterday was a straight day, today was anything but. A number of big loops and turns got us feeling like we weren’t making progress. An early lunch break gave us some much needed energy.

From lunch it was another 11 km to a well deserved break. I could tell Chris really wanted to take respite at the Mono Cliffs Inn, when he asked “what do you think?”. It would add 0.5 km to our trip today. And when you’re traveling more than 30 km, every 100 metres counts.

I think taking our refreshment break was a great idea. It gave us time to relax and re-energize.

It was another 8 km or so from the Inn. A few more hills, a grassy section and a stretch on the road. Funny how the last two kilometres always feel the longest.

We are so thankful to our hosts tonight, Trail Angels Deb and Morley Shorthill for having us.

Currently snacking on some peaches and ice cream on a comfy bed.

Friday Facts:
I thought that the Niagara Escarpment was made by glaciers. I seem to have been wrong. Glaciers have played an important role in creating our diverse landscape but they are not the reason we have the escarpment. According to Wikipedia: The escarpment formed over millions of years through a process of differential erosion of rocks of different hardnesses. Through time the soft rocks weather away or erode by the action of streams. The gradual removal of the soft rocks undercuts the resistant caprock, leaving a cliff or escarpment. The erosional process is most readily seen at Niagara Falls, where the river has quickened the process.

Happy Trails,
Natalie